GoPro Fishing Setup & Tips To Record Incredible Video


GoPro Fishing Setup
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If you’re looking to record your fishing action then you’re in the right place. One of the best things to get is a GoPro and in this post, I’m going to be showing you everything you need to get to get your GoPro set up for fishing and also some other tips.

Here are the things you’ll need to get:

  1. GoPro (or alternative).
  2. External microphone.
  3. GoPro mount (I prefer chest strap).

There are some other things you can get to make the process much easier but this is the gear you’ll need to get. Most of my video is done through a GoPro (using a chest mount) and the rest is simply done using a phone.

It doesn’t really matter if you want to record your fishing to post on the internet or just to see how you can improve, this setup will be all you need. See the rest of my filming gear here.

GoPro

The first thing you’ll need to get is a GoPro (obviously). I have the Hero 2 and Hero 4 and they work perfectly fine. There’s been a lot of new competition come on the market but I don’t really have much experience with them. They are quite a bit cheaper though so you might want to check them out.

Pretty much any of them will do and it all really comes down to how much you want to spend. Obviously, the newest GoPro will have better specs than my Hero 2 but it’s done the job just fine. Just check to make sure it has good reviews and pull the trigger.

gopro for fishing

You’ll want to make sure the model you get comes with some accessories. I put mine in a waterproof case and have had quite a few times where it fell in (so I was glad I had that). The case also lets you strap it to your mount. You can buy cases separately for not that much but just make sure you have one.

The GoPro that I use now is the Hero 8 but a great entry-level is the AKASO V50x (see on Amazon).

External Microphone

The next thing you’ll want to get is a microphone. The GoPro will record audio but when it’s in the waterproof case it won’t be very good. You’ll want to get a mic you can clip onto your shirt to get the best audio possible (it’s the most important thing for quality video).

Any clip-on lapel microphone will do the job and you can normally get them for like 10-20 bucks. All you have to do is plug the mic into your GoPro, clip it on your shirt, and you’re good to go. Make sure to check what type of inset your GoPro has (Aux or USB). Some cases have a hole so you can plug your mic in but mine didn’t and I had to drill one myself.

record audio for fishing

You’ll also want to make sure your mic has something that’ll block out the wind. If you don’t then you’ll hear wind the entire time (which sucks after hours of filming). You can buy a windscreen or wind muff pretty much anywhere (here’s what I use).

GoPro Mount

The final thing you’ll need to do is get yourself some sort of mount. You can get one that clips on or one that has suction but I prefer using a chest mount to get the best quality point of view video. Some GoPro cameras will come with it but if not then you can buy one for like 20 bucks.

You can also use a head mount but it’s kind of a hassle having it there and tends to fall off easier. Most people use a chest strap and it’s what I like using the best. All you have to do now is put on the chest strap, put the camera in its case and attach it to the mount, and then plug in your mic.

gopro mount for fishing

If you’re fishing from a boat then you might want to use a clip-on mount. If that’s the case, you’re probably best to go with a gooseneck mount. It’ll simply clip onto any part of your boat.

Additional GoPro Fishing Tips

That’s pretty much the main thing you’ll need to get to start recording your fishing adventure. There are some other things you can do to improve the quality so let’s jump into that.

Keep your GoPro filming.

This makes sure you actually get the video of the fish being landed. Also, it makes editing so much easier so you don’t have to look around for the right clip. It’ll also be easier because you can focus on bringing the fish in and not worrying about turning the camera on first.

I’ve lost my fair share of fish because I had a camera issue and it definitely sucks. It will give you a bunch of videos to go through but you can always set your camera on loop mode to get rid of all the useless footage. If you’re going to keep your camera filming then you should read the next tip.

Bring extra batteries and SD cards.

Your GoPro battery is only going to last a certain amount of time and the worst thing that can happen is to run out of juice in the middle of your trip. The same thing goes for your SD card filling up.

Get yourself an extra battery (or two) and an extra SD card. You can also get a battery bank to plug into but you’ll have to wait for it to charge. I think swapping the battery is the best option.

Take some underwater footages.

Take some cool underwater shots to spice up your video. I’m sure your face is pretty and all but it’s good to change up the angles every now and then. You can get an extendable pole (most accessory packs have one) to throw in the water as you’re bringing the fish it. It gets a pretty cool shot.

It’ll also show you how the fish are interacting with your bait. You can easily tell what they like and what they totally ignore. There’s no point sitting there for 3 hours if the fish aren’t interested in what you’re giving them.

Use anti-fog inserts if fogging happens.

Sometimes the GoPro case tends to fog up. You can get little inserts that go in and prevent things from fogging up. They do work pretty good but I don’t use them a whole lot. I have a pack of them just in case because they’re cheap.

They’ll come in handy eventually so it’s always good to be prepared.

Cut out all the nonsense.

If you’re uploading videos on the internet then you’ll want to cut out all the boring footage of nothing going on. Nobody wants to sit through 2 hours of nothing happening. Use only the exciting parts and get rid of the rest. Follow these tips and you’ll be well on your way to making quality fishing videos.

Happy fishing. There are plenty of fish in the sea.

Let me know your thoughts and any questions you have. Like this article? Feel free to give it a share!

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Jon Webber

I'm Jon and welcome to Backcountry Cariboo. I'm not a fishing or outdoors "expert" but I spend a lot of time in the outdoors and my goal is to educate, entertain, and promote the outdoor lifestyle.

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