27+ Fishing Knots You Need To Know (And How To Tie Them)


27+ Fishing Knots You Need To Know
Backcountry Cariboo utilizes affiliate links, which means when you buy through links on our site, we will receive a small commission at no cost to you.

Even though it’d be nice to only have to know one fishing knot, that’s sadly not the case. There are certain knots that work well for different things and in this post, I’m going to be showing you the most popular fishing knots, what they’re used for, and how to properly tie them.

There are a bunch of different options you can pick from when it comes to choosing your knot. If you’re tying braid to fluorocarbon you might want to use something different than if you were tying fluoro to fluoro. You don’t need to know all of these knots but the more you do know, the better off and more prepared you’ll be. Everything will be in alphabetical order so let’s get started.

Alberto Knot

This knot is a great way to connect two lines of different thicknesses. I use this knot a lot when I need to connect braid to a fluorocarbon/mono leader. My leader is normally thicker than my main fishing line and this knot works great. You can also use it to attach two sizes of fluorocarbon/monofilament. Here’s how you tie the Alberto Knot:

  1. Make a loop with the leader material (or thicker line) and run the braided line through the loop. Give yourself 8-10 inches of braid to play with.
  2. Take the braided line and wrap it around the leader line 7 times (wrap it around both leader lines). Wrap it another 7 times in the opposite direction.
  3. Put the tag end of your braid back through the loop.
  4. Make sure the wraps are nice and tight and pull both lines tight and cut the excess line.

Albright Knot

This knot is a great way to connect two different types of lines that are different diameters. You can use it to attach braid to mono or fluoro but one of the more common situations where people will use this knot is when they attach fly fishing line to their leader material. Here’s how you tie the Albright Knot:

  1. Make a loop with the heavier line and feed the lighter line through. Leave yourself 8-10 inches of thinner line to play with.
  2. Take the lighter line and wrap it around both strands of heavier line 10 times.
  3. Feed the lighter line back through the loop (exit the same side as it entered).
  4. Hold both strands of the heavier line and make sure the wraps are nice and tight. Continue holding the two thicker lines and pull the lighter line tight. Clip the tag end.

Arbor Knot

This knot is probably the best way to tie fishing line to your spool. This knot isn’t overly important because you should never put yourself in a spot where you have no line left. It’s always a good thing to do anyway and it’s super simple. Here’s how to tie the Arbor Knot:

  1. Take your fishing line and wrap it around your spool.
  2. Take the tag end of your line and make a simple overhand knot around the main fishing line.
  3. Take the tag end again and tie another simple overhand knot one to two inches above the first (don’t tie it around the main fishing line).
  4. Pull the main fishing line tight so the first knot slides down and the second jams against the first.

Bimini Twist Knot

This knot is a great way to add some extra support to your fishing line and works really well when you want to attach a leader to your main line. It’s pretty much a knot that’s 100% secure and you’ll attach the second line with a Bristol Knot or some other loop to loop knot. Here’s how to tie the Bimini Twist Knot:

  1. Make a loop with your fishing line and twist the loop 20 times.
  2. Place the loop on something to make it secure.
  3. Take the tag end and wrap it back towards the loop so the first twists are covered. Keep tension on the line.
  4. Put the tag end through the top of the loop and make an overhand knot. Secure it in place.
  5. Take your tag end and wrap it 5 times around the loop. Start from the tip and work your way towards your knot.
  6. Feed the tag end between the loop and the tag line and tighten up the twists so they’re against your original knot.

Blood Knot

This knot is one of the more common knots I’ll use myself and it works great for connecting two lines together. The two lines should be fairly close in terms of thickness for the best results (but they don’t have to be). I normally use this knot to connect my backing to my main fishing line and then my main fishing line to my leader. Here’s how to tie the Blood Knot:

  1. Overlap the two lines and wrap one of them around the other 5 times. Take the tag end and put it back between the two lines (where you crossed them).
  2. Take the second line and wrap it 5 times around the first line in the opposite direction. Take the tag end and put it back between the two lines (the opposite way).
  3. Slowly pull the two lines together and cut the excess line (wet the knot if you can).

Bobber Stop Knot

This knot is really useful if you’re fishing with a bobber and need to cast a decent distance. It goes on top of a sliding bobber and will prevent your bobber from sliding too far up. It works well because you can reel it through the eyelets on your rod so you’re able to really cast it out there. Here’s how you tie the Bobber Stop Knot:

  1. Take 6 to 8 inches of line and put it against your main fishing line where you want the knot to be. Make a loop with the bobber stop line.
  2. Take the bobber stop line and wrap it around both lines 3 to 4 times.
  3. Take the two tags ends and slowly pull them tight.

Bristol Knot

This knot is used for connecting line to a loop. It works well when you need to connect braid to monofilament but it’ll still work for other types of combos as well. The first thing you’ll need to have is a loop knot already made. Something like the Bimini Twist Knot. Here’s how to tie the Bristol Knot:

  1. Feed your tag end through the loop knot that’s already made.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it 7 times around the double line (the loop).
  3. Bring the tag end back to the start and feed it between the loop and the first twist (should go above the loop and below the first twist you made).

Clinch/Improved Clinch Knot

The Clinch Knot is pretty much another name for the classic fishing knot and is one of the more popular because it’s so easy. It works well for connecting a hook to mono or fluoro (doesn’t work well for braid). The improved version of the knot adds an extra step and will make it that much stronger. Here’s how to tie the Clinch and Improved Clinch Knot:

  1. Take your fishing line and feed it through the eye of the hook.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it 7 times around itself (away from the hook).
  3. Take the tag end and bring it back towards the hook and feed it through the loop above the eye of the hook.
  4. Slowly pull your main fishing line and the knot will secure together.
  5. To do the improved and more secure version, start with steps 1-3. Before you pull the knot tight, feed the tag end through the big second loop and then pull tight.

Davy/Double Davy Knot

This knot works really for well for tying smaller flies to your fishing line. It’s something that can be done really quickly and the knot is nice and small. The Double Davy adds an extra step and it’ll make things that much more secure. I’d recommend the Double version. Here’s how to tie the Davy and Double Davy Knot:

  1. Take your fishing line and feed it through the eye of the fly.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it around your line so it makes an overhand knot.
  3. Take the tag end and feed it back through the loop so it goes between the hook and the overhand knot.
  4. Slowly pull the main fishing line so everything becomes secure.
  5. To do the double version of the knot, start with steps 1-3. Before you pull the knot tight, feed the tag end back through the loop one more time. You can then pull everything tight.

Double Uni Knot

This knot works well when you need to connect two different lines together. It’s a lot more simple than some of the other lines out there and it’s just as strong. It’s awesome for connecting braid to mono or fluoro. Here’s how to tie the Double Uni Knot:

  1. Overlap the two lines and leave enough tag end to work with.
  2. Take the tag end of the fluoro/mono, double back, and wrap it 4 times around both lines and through the loop.
  3. Take your braided line and do the exact same thing but wrap it 7 or 8 times and feed it through the loop.
  4. Pull the two lines and your knots should tighten up together.

Drop Shot Knot

This is a really good setup if the fish are being picky about what they want to bite. It’ll have a weight on the very bottom and then a hook will be suspended above the weight to keep your bait above the bottom. You’ll then move your bait around and it should intrigue something to come bite. Here’s how to tie a Drop Shot Knot:

  1. Take your fishing line and feed it through the eye of the hook. Feed your tag end back through the eye so there’s a loop on one side of the hook. Give yourself a decent amount of line to work with.
  2. Tie a simple overhand knot.
  3. Take the original loop and feed your hook through it.
  4. Pull everything tight.
  5. Take your tag end and feed it through the top of the hook.
  6. Tie a weight to the end of your tag end.

Dropper Loop Knot

This knot is really useful if you’re looking to attach a second lure or hook to a single fishing line. You could also use it to attach a weight to your line without having to use a 3-way swivel. Here’s how to tie the Dropper Loop Knot:

  1. Make a loop in the line where you want your knot to be.
  2. Take the line that’s connected to your reel and wrap it 5 times around the loop.
  3. Take the bottom of your original loop and push it through the new loop. Hold with your teeth and wet the knot.
  4. Pull each end of the line tight and you should have a secure loop. You can cut the loop so you’re able to tie on a hook.

Egg Loop Knot

If you’re fishing with eggs you probably know they can be tricky to keep on the hook. An Egg Loop Knot will secure them better on the hook and it’ll make your life a lot easier. All you have to do is wrap the loop around the eggs and you should be good to go. Here’s how to tie the Egg Loop Knot:

  1. Take your fishing line and feed it through the eye of the hook until the tag end reaches the bend.
  2. Take the opposite end and wrap it at least 10 times (wrap should go around hook and line.
  3. Take the tag end and feed it back through the eye of the hook in the opposite direction.
  4. Take the loop and make 5 more wraps.
  5. Pull the tag end to tighten the knot.
  6. You can then push your line and you’ll have a loop to secure the eggs.

FG Knot

This knot is one of the more popular options for connecting a leader to braided line (it can still be used for other types of line). It’s not the easiest knot by any means but it’s super strong and should never come undone. I’ve seen quite a few different ways to tie this knot but this way is the easiest, in my opinion. Here’s how to tie the FG Knot:

  1. Take your main fishing line and lay it over the top of the leader line. Pinch the two lines. Leave 10 inches of tag line on the main line and 4 inches on the leader line.
  2. Take the main part of your main fishing line and wrap it around the tag end of the leader. Pinch the two lines again.
  3. Take the tag end of your main fishing line and wrap it around the tag end of the leader. Pinch the two lines again.
  4. Repeat this for a total of ten times.
  5. Take the tag end of the braid and tie two half hitch knots around the main part of the braid and the leader line (the hitch knots should be at the top of your knot). Tighten the tag end.
  6. Take the tag end of the braid and tie two more half hitch knots around the main part of the braided line. Pull both ends of the braid tight.
  7. Grab the leader and braided line and pull tight.
  8. Cut off the tag ends and double-check your knot is tight.

Fish N Fool Knot

This is a super strong knot that works well for tying braided line to a hook or swivel. It’s very similar to the Uni knot but it’s going to be better for braid. It’s extremely simple to tie and is one you should probably know. Here’s how to tie the Fish N Fool Knot:

  1. Feed your line through the eye of the hook and wrap it around the eye twice.
  2. Take the tag end and make a loop.
  3. Take the tag end and wrap it 5 times around the double line.
  4. Wet the knot and pull on the tag end to snug up the knot.
  5. Slide the knot down and pull everything tight.

Haywire Twist Knot

This is probably the knot you’ll want to use if you’re connecting a wire to a hook or swivel. It’s super strong and is pretty simple to tie. You’ll only need to know this knot if you’re going after some of the bigger fish out there. Here’s how to tie the Haywire Twist Knot:

  1. Take your wire and feed it through the eye of the hook or swivel. Bring it back so it forms a loop.
  2. Hold the spot where the wire crossed and twist them 4 times. Be sure to twist both of them at the same time.
  3. Take the tag end and wrap it 5 times around the main part of the wire.
  4. Bend the tag end back and forth to break it off (or cut it).

J Knot

This knot is one of the strongest knots for connecting a leader to your main fishing line. It’s used often for fly fishing but it works well for all types of lines. It’s not the easiest knot in the world to tie but it’s one you should know. It’s very similar to the Surgeon’s Knot if you’re familiar with that. Here’s how to tie the J Knot:

  1. Take your leader line and overlap it with your main fishing line.
  2. Make a loop and do an overhand knot (but don’t pull it tight).
  3. Take the double line and go around the bottom of the loop.
  4. Feed the double line through the loop and go around the top of the loop.
  5. Repeat this again so you have 2 wraps around the top and 2 around the bottom.
  6. Wet the knot and pull tight.

Knotless Knot

This is a pretty simple knot that’ll let you use bait without having to attach it to a hook. You’ll have some line below the hook and that’s where you’ll attach your bait. It’s pretty common for carp fishing. Here’s how to tie the Knotless Knot:

  1. The first thing you’ll need to do is tie a loop on one end of your line. Feed the other end through the eye of the hook. Adjust the length so you’re satisfied with the loop position.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it 5 times around the hook and line.
  3. Take the tag end and feed it through the eye of the hook.
  4. Hold the loop in place and tighten up the tag end. Wet the knot and make sure the knot sits beside the eye.

Nail Knot

This knot works really well when you need to connect a leader to fly fishing line. It’s super easy to do and it should never come undone if you do it right. You’ll also need a nail or stick or a hollow tube. Here’s how to tie the Nail Knot:

  1. Put your nail or tube against the fly line and then do the same with your leader line. Give yourself a decent amount of line to work with on the tag end.
  2. Take the tag end of your leader and make 6 wraps around both lines and the nail.
  3. Take the tag end and feed it through the tube or through the area where the nail is. Pull the tag end out the other side and remove the nail or tube.
  4. Pull the tag end to tighten up the wraps and pull both lines to secure the knot. Cut excess line.

Non-Slip Loop Knot

This knot is used to attach your lure to your line and it’s supposed to give a more natural presentation in the water. It’s able to move more freely because it can move around on the loop and isn’t secured in place by a normal knot. Here’s how to tie the Non-Slip Loop Knot:

  1. Make an overhand knot and leave yourself 8-10 inches of tag end to work with.
  2. Take the tag end and feed it through the eye of the lure. Bring the tag end back through the loop you just made.
  3. Wrap the tag end around the line 5 times and put the tag end back through the loop again.
  4. Wet the knot and pull the tag end so the wraps tighten up. Pull the main line to secure the knot.

Offshore Swivel Knot

This is a super strong knot that’s going to work well if you’re fighting bigger fish or are in an area with a lot of sharp rocks or debris. You can use it to attach a swivel or hook but you’re going to need to have a loop knot already tied (Bimini Twist Knot). Here’s how to tie the Offshore Swivel Knot:

  1. Take your loop and feed it through the eye of the hook or swivel.
  2. Take the loop and fold it back and hold it in place.
  3. Take the hook/swivel and feed it through the loop 4 or 5 times.
  4. Hold the swivel and pull on the main fishing line to tighten the knot. I always like to wet my knots before pulling them tight.

Palomar Knot

This is one of the more popular knots for tying braid to a hook or swivel. You can use it with other fishing lines but it’s super important when you’re working with braid. I don’t want to call it a 100% knot but it’s really close. Here’s how to tie the Palomar Knot:

  1. Make a loop with your line and feed it through the eye of your hook or swivel. Make sure your loop is 3-4 inches long.
  2. Tie an overhand knot but don’t pull it tight.
  3. Take your hook or swivel and feed it through the loop.
  4. Slowly pull everything tight and make sure the knot is on the eye of the hook or swivel. Wet the knot for best results.

Perfection Loop Knot

This knot works really well when you need to tie a loop at the end of your line. It’s one of the easier loop knots in my opinion and it’s just as strong as any. Here’s how to tie the Perfection Loop Knot:

  1. Make a loop at the end of your line. Give yourself some tag end to work with.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it around the main part of the line so you have a second loop.
  3. Take the tag end and put it between the two loops.
  4. Take the second loop you made and put it through the first loop.
  5. Pull the second loop tight and cut off the tag end.

Rapala Knot

This knot is similar to the Non-Slip Loop Knot and is designed to give your lure a more natural presentation in the water. It’s tied to the line on a loop and that’ll let it move more freely. Here’s how to tie the Rapala Knot:

  1. Make an overhand knot but don’t tighten it.
  2. Take the tag end and feed it through the eye of the hook. Put the tag end back through the overhand knot.
  3. Take the tag end and wrap it 3 times around the main part of the line. Bring it back through the overhand knot.
  4. Take the tag end and feed it through the loop you just made.
  5. Wet the knot and slowly pull everything tight.

San Diego Jam Knot

This knot works really well when you need to tie heavier lures on your line. It’ll work for all types of line and it is pretty simple to work with. It’s also been called the Reverse Clinch Knot. Here’s how to tie the San Diego Jam Knot:

  1. Feed your line through the eye of the hook and bring it back so it forms a loop.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it 7 times around the double line (back towards the hook).
  3. On the last wrap, take the tag end and run it between the double line.
  4. Take the tag end and feed it through the loop of the first wrap.
  5. Wet the knot and slowly pull everything tight (the knot should be right against the hook).

Seaguar Knot

This knot works really well when you need to connect fluorocarbon to monofilament. It’s a pretty simple concept and I’ve never had any issues with the knot coming apart. Here’s how to tie the Seaguar Knot:

  1. Make a loop in both lines and hold them side by side (hold them together at the base of the loop).
  2. Put your finger through both loops and twist them 3 times.
  3. Feed both tag ends through the loop you just made.
  4. Wet the knot and pull on all 4 lines to secure the knot. Pull the main two lines to tighten the knot.

Slim Beauty Knot

This knot is a great way to attach a leader to the main fishing line but it works extremely well when you need to connect braid to monofilament. It also has a low profile which a lot of people will want. Here’s how to tie the Slim Beauty Knot:

  1. Tie a double overhand knot with the leader.
  2. Slowly pull the line tight until it forms a figure eight.
  3. Double up some of your main line and feed it through each side of figure eight.
  4. Wrap the double line up the leader 4 times and then back down 3 times.
  5. Pass the doubled line through the loop that was made from the first wrap.
  6. Slowly tighten the figure eight by pulling the two leader lines. Pull the leader line and the doubled main line until the knot becomes tight.
  7. Cut the excess line and loop.

Snell Knot

This knot is a great way to attach your fishing line to a hook. It’s extremely simple to tie and it’s going to be stronger than a traditional fishing knot. Here’s how to tie the Snell Knot:

  1. Feed your line through the top of the eye and down the hook.
  2. Loop your line back and wrap it 5 times around the hook and through the loop.
  3. Slowly tighten the knot and make sure the knot is against the eye of the hook.

Spider Hitch Knot

If you need to tie a loop knot but find the Bimini Twist to be a bit too tricky, you can use this knot. It’s not going to be as strong but it’s easier and can be done a lot quicker. Here’s how to tie the Spider Hitch Knot:

  1. Double your line and then make a loop. Hold the loop with your thumb and finger.
  2. Take the doubled line and wrap it around your thumb and the loop 5 times (do at least 10 if you’re using braid).
  3. Take the doubled line and feed it through the loop.
  4. Wet the knot and pull everything tight.

Surgeon’s Knot

This is one of the best knots for connecting two different lines together. It can be used by all types and sizes of line and I like it a lot because it’s almost 100% secure and it’s one of the easier knots to tie. Here’s how to tie the Surgeon’s Knot:

  1. Overlap the two fishing lines and leave yourself enough tag end to work with.
  2. Take both lines and form a loop.
  3. Take the tag end of the main line and entire leader and pass it through the loop 2 times.
  4. Wet the knot and pull all 4 lines tight.

Surgeon’s Loop Knot

This is one of my favorite knots for making a loop in my line. I really like it because it’s super simple and is just as strong as anything else. You can then attach a leader by doing a loop to loop connection. Here’s how to tie the Surgeon’s Loop Knot:

  1. Double your line and make an overhand knot (don’t tighten it).
  2. Wrap the doubled loop around the knot again.
  3. Hold the main part of your line and tag end and pull the loop tight.

Trilene Knot

This knot is a really good way to connect monofilament and fluorocarbon to swivels, hooks, and lures. It doesn’t work that well for braid but I like it for the other types because it’s so simple and is really strong. Here’s how to tie the Trilene Knot:

  1. Feed your line through the eye of the hook or swivel twice. It should create a loop.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it around the main part of the line 5 times.
  3. Bring the tag end back and put it through both loops.
  4. Wet the knot and slowly pull everything tight.

Uni Knot

This knot works really well when you need to connect monofilament to swivels, hooks, and lures. It could be used for fluoro but I think there are better options out there for that. Here’s how to tie the Uni Knot:

  1. Run your line through the swivel or eye of the hook. Double back and form a loop.
  2. Take the tag end and wrap it 6 times around both lines and then put it through the loop.
  3. Wet knot and slowly pull everything tight.

Yucatan Knot

This knot is one of the strongest when you need to connect braid to monofilament. The first thing you’ll need to do is tie a loop knot with your main fishing line. The Bimini Twist Knot works well. Here’s how to tie the Yucatan Knot:

  1. Wrap the doubled main line around the leader 5 times.
  2. Take the end of the leader and feed it through the loop at the end of the main fishing line.
  3. Pull the main line and leader line in opposite directions to tighten the knot.

Jon Webber

I'm Jon and welcome to Backcountry Cariboo. I'm not a fishing or outdoors "expert" but I spend a lot of time in the outdoors and my goal is to educate, entertain, and promote the outdoor lifestyle.

Recent Content